Happiness

Happiness, it’s a weird one.  Something long hunted, but always found so very close to home.  Literally in us.  So simple it can seem impossible.  Indeed, the first version of this had a dark existential crisis vibe.

What has changed?  Well for one thing I’m happy but perhaps the why is more important.  Doing what makes me happy.  The mirror of that unhappy mood is happiness, everything we’re searching for reflected back to us at all times.

Happiness is a habit, so is unhappiness.  Both are choices made by the way we choose to be and what we choose to do.  That unhappy post was so grandiose, it had Artistotle and Erasmus, big plans and was seeped in frustration.  That grandiose style was exactly the barrier.

Happiness isn’t waiting round the corner, it isn’t in the big life plans.  It’s now, in the smallest things.  Like Zen says i guess, love what you do – even if you’re doing something you don’t. And big things, big dreams, they’re made on the small stuff.  They’ll happen soon enough.  The journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step, reads The Lao Tzu.

Living in the happy present makes frustrating experiences perhaps even pleasant ones – and makes future steps happy ones to.  Still sometimes we choose to make unhappy ones even if it’s a choice made by lack of choosing.  One thing written in that dark place rings true, even on this brighter side.

Happiness can require bravery, in actions.  Whether that’s a big step or looking for the light in something.  It also needs maintenance – nourished by doing what is true to us and taking care, not do joining that so tempting flow.

Happiness is a philosophy, a way of living, being and seeing.  To follow the example of Socrates seems apt.  He was too busy living his philosophy to ever write it down himself.  Time to give this happiness business another go.

David James Horn ©

4 thoughts on “Happiness

  1. I like to define happiness as a state of no suffering, and I equate unhappiness as suffering. Doubtlessly, Taoism teaches a method for attaining happiness which is closer to contentment than to one’s greatest desire. Yet, I’d like to note that Lao Tzu and other Taoists do not force, for lack of a better word, themselves to love the things that they don’t. It’s the reasons in Taoism that consequently make them have ‘love’ for everything. (I’d go so far as to say that Taoists have no preference, so no love/hate.)

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    1. That sense of Universal love is what I’m seeking, whilst painfully aware it is already within. Happiness is something I attain more often than not but at some point I must travel to India, Asia and China. Any happiness I find here is typically a result of wisdom found there. There is much to rediscover and learn, and it isn’t in the West. Thanks for your comment, it’s very informative!

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  2. How wise you are, David! Happiness as a way of life… what a concept. Love it!

    I also agree with Hui Ho’s comment, that happiness is a lack of suffering; that makes sense to me. I often tell myself that the “pain” is inevitable, but suffering is optional…

    I would emphasize that lack of judgement goes a long way toward cultivating this place of happiness, as judgment seems to take huge chunks out of my contentment. Still, even knowing that, I struggle to maintain such non-judgmental balance…

    Wonderful post! Thanks for sharing… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Contentment is such a good concept, and this place is full of judgment you’re right. Takes away from that contentment severely. And why, because they are unhappy and insecure so must inflict it? It becomes a habit to assume it ib the West! I need to go East haha

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